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I recently asked this question: Whose responsibility is it to design test cases?.

On its face, it seems like a question with a definitive answer (eg. "The responsibility lies with ..."). The thing is, I honestly don't know which of the answers is the right one. They all bring up very good points, some are more general than others, and they don't all agree.

If this had been a programming question, either on Stackoverflow or elsewhere, it would have been easy to choose an answer to mark correct: it would be the one whose solution I applied successfully, and which contained the most helpful explanation or information. However I'm not sure how to decide what the "right" answer is for a "soft" question.

How do I choose an answer for this kind of question? I want to avoid personal bias (eg. "I'm choosing this answer because I'm upset and your answer vindicates my feelings of frustration"), but at the same time I'm not sure that leaving it up to a popularity poll via voting is correct. Or is it equally valid to not "accept" a single answer?

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I would go for the question: which one helped you the most? In these types of questions there is often not a good and a bad. Your context differs from mine, what I find important is likely different from your views. I have seen highly up voted questions which in my book were wrong, and the other way around. That is why opinion based questions are often closed or down voted.

But in this channel I feel we should have some space for it as that is part what helps define the profession, I think ;-)

Note: as I added an answer to your mentioned question I pondered whether I should answer here...

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  • "Your context divers from mine"? Jul 17 '18 at 21:22

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